Tag Archives: GCSE language

Language Paper 2: Non Fiction Writing: Planning a Response

This is your third lesson practising the persuasive writing skills you will need for English Language Paper 2. In today’s lesson, we are going to look at a specific writing question and plan a response.

Today you will:

  • Recap how to spot the form, audience and purpose of a writing task
  • Practise planning an extended piece of writing
  • Write an engaging introduction which fits the needs of the audience.

You will need:

  • Something to make notes with – either pen/paper or on a computer / device.

TASK ONE:

Read the writing task below. Once you have read it, identify the audience for the task, the purpose of the task and the form or type of writing you are bing asked to attempt. Try to add to your notes ideas about the style, tone and formality you may need to use in your writing

‘Education is not just about which school you go to, or what qualifications you gain; it is also about what you learn from your experiences outside of school.’


Write a speech for your school or college Leavers’ Day to explain what you think makes a good education.

Task One Feedback:

Hopefully you noticed the following things:

  • Form: You are being asked to write a speech. This means that you have to imagine your words would be read aloud to an audience, probably sat in front of you!
  • Purpose: To explain your ideas on education. This should be an opinionated piece where you seek to persuade your audience.
  • Audience: The audience would be students your own age. This might change they way you write, as you would be speaking to your friends and your peers.

TASK TWO: GATHERING IDEAS

Planning: The first stage of planning is to gather ideas. Using either a mindmap or bullet point list, spend 5-10 minutes gathering as many ideas as possible. Use some of the questions below to get you thinking:

  • Education: What does this word mean to you? Why is it important? Are there different ways to be educated?
  • School: How do schools provide an education? Do they give a wide enough education? Are there things schools do well? Things they do badly?
  • Qualifications:Why are things like GCSES and A Levels important? What other things are important that do not appear on tests?
  • Experiences: How do other experiences (hobbies, work, home life, friendships) also provide an education? Why are different experiences important?

TIP: At this point it is ok to write down as many ideas as possible. In the next task you will need to choose your best ideas and think about the order they might appear in your speech.

TASK THREE: PLANNING

Now you are going to narrow down your ideas and make a five point plan. I would use five sub-headings and try to follow the planning structure pictured below. Read the blue box for some tips if you get stuck.

You can dowload the planning guidelines here:

TIPS: The most important part of your plan are the middle three paragraphs. Here is where you will make your arguments. If you are stuck, look at the list you made for task two and pick the 3 most interesting and important ideas. 1) What is wrong with education? 2) Why is it so bad? 3) How would you fix it?

TASK FOUR: Writing the opening.

Now you have your plan, let’s get started. Write the opening of your speech. This might only be 4-5 sentences. Remember you are speaking to people your own age at a school assembly / leavers day event.

Tips: Think about how you can engage the audience with some of the techniques you practised in the last two lessons, such as short simple sentences, emotive language or inclusive pronouns (our, we, us).

Possible starting sentences:

Good afternoon everyone. I am extremely pround to be here speaking to you today…

Hello and welcome. First, let me say well done and congratulations for…….

Today, I would like us to consider something incredibly important…

Well, we made it! We have been through…. we have….. we have…… But, can we really say that we have received a true education?

Well done everyone! Don’t forget to upload your work onto SMH and share it with your teacher.

Language Paper 2: Non Fiction Writing: Second Lesson

This lesson is similar to your last language lesson, but will look at a different example and discuss some different techniques that you can use.
In this lesson you will:

  • Revise different persuasive devices
  • Identify and consider the effect of the persuasive devices
  • Begin to use persuasive devices in your work for effect
    • In your GCSE English Language exam, you will have to complete a piece of Non fiction writing. This could be a speech or a letter for example. In your writing you must demonstrate that you can write for a specific reason and argue your ideas clearly.

You will need:

  • A downloaded copy of the speech that we will be looking at today
  • Something to make notes with – either pen/paper or on a computer / device.

TASK ONE:

Open the speech by the Emma Watson. She gave this speech in 2014 to the UN as part of the launch of a campaign working to achieve equal rights for men and women,

  1. What is the purpose of her speech? How do you know this?
  2. As outlined above, her audience was the United Nations. However who specifically do you think she was aiming this speech at? Age? Gender?

TASK TWO:

Emma Watson uses many persuasive devices in her speech. Below is a list of some of the persuasive devices that she uses. Find an example of each device and explain why she has used this device. There is sentence starter to help you on the first one. Use the internet to help you if you are unsure what a specific persuasive device is.

  • Repetition (specifically anaphora)
    An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Direct Address:
    An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Repetition of a personal pronoun (specifically ‘us’):
    The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Anecdote:
    An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………

These are just some persuasive devices that writers use. We will cover a lot more before your exams. It is important to only use persuasive devices when you want to create a specific effect or meaning. Overusing devices can make your work hard to understand.

TASK THREE:

Now we you are going to write a paragraph using one of the persuasive devices above. We are going to focus on this question:

Write a speech persuading the government to make the weekend longer                                                                       

Step 1: Decide one reason why the weekend should be longer (you can argue that the weekend shouldn’t be longer if you prefer!)

Step 2: Decide which persuasive device you are going to use in your paragraph. The choices are below too!

  • Repetition (anaphora)
  • Direct address
  • Repetition of a personal pronoun (us)
  • Anecdote

My example is below. Can you guess which persuasive device I have chosen to focus on?

Imagine a world where you had the time to relax more often, where you could have more than two lay ins a week, where you could spend more time with your family. That’s the world that we could have if we extended the weekend to three days.

TASK FOUR:

Now it is your turn! Write 1 paragraph persuading the government to extend the weekend. You must use one device that we have looked at today. Some possible ideas and sentence starters are below to help you get started!

Ideas: everyone would be less tired and more productive, people would spend more time with those they love, people would have more hobbies...

People need…

Science suggests that…

It is vital that…

Imagine…

Well done everyone! Don’t forget to upload your work onto SMH and share it with your teacher.

Language Paper 2: non fiction writing

In this lesson you will:

  • Revise different persuasive devices
  • Identify and consider the effect of the persuasive devices
  • Begin to use persuasive devices in your work for effect
    • In your GCSE English Language exam, you will have to complete a piece of Non fiction writing. This could be a speech or a letter for example. In your writing you must demonstrate that you can write for a specific reason and argue your ideas clearly.

You will need:

  • A downloaded copy of the speech that we will be looking at today
  • Something to make notes with – either pen/paper or on a computer / device.

TASK ONE:

Open the speech by the President of USA. He gave this speech to the Nation following the 9/11 attack. As you read through the speech answer the following questions below:

  1. What is the purpose of his speech? How do you know this?
  2. As outline above, his audience was the nation of America. However who specifically do you think he was aiming this speech at? Age? Gender?

TASK TWO:

The President uses many persuasive devices in his speech. Below is a list of some of the persuasive devices that he uses. Find an example of each device and and explain why the president has used this device. There is sentence starter to help you on the first one. Use the internet to help you if you are unsure what a specific persuasive device is.

  • Listing= An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Emotive Language- An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Repetition of a possessive pronoun– An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Short simple sentence– An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………
  • Semantic field (lexical field) of war/ battle– An example is “…………….” The writer has done this to show us/ teach us/ guide us/ emphasise/ highlight that………

These are just some persuasive devices that writers use. We will cover a lot more before your exams. It is important to only use persuasive devices when you want to create a specific effect or meaning. Overusing devices can make your work hard to understand.

TASK THREE:

Now we you are going to write a paragraph using one of the persuasive devices above. We are going to focus on this question:

Write a speech persuading your Headteacher to extend lunchtime                                                                           

Step 1: Decide one reason why the Headteacher should extend lunchtime (you can argue that the Headteacher should shorten lunch times if you prefer!)

Step 2: Decide which persuasive device you are going to use in your paragraph. The choices are below too!

  • Listing
  • Emotive Language
  • Repetition of a possessive pronoun (Our)
  • Short simple sentence
  • Semantic field (lexical field) of war/ battle

My example is below. Can you guess which persuasive device I have chosen to focus on?

Students, especially those of us in GCSE classes, need a break. Our minds are exhausted with the constant concentration that every lesson requires. We sit there sometimes willing ourselves to keep focused, to keep going! The gruelling, demanding timetable is extinguishing our joy of learning and forcing us into shells of our former selves.

TASK FOUR:

Now it is your turn! Write 1 paragraph persuading the Headteacher to extend lunchtimes. You must use one device that we have looked at today. Some possible ideas and sentence starters are below to help you get started!

Ideas- important to socialise with friends/ need exercise and fresh air to learn/ struggle to concentrate for long periods of time.

Students need….

Science suggests that…

It is vital that…..

Despite the importance of exams,….

Well done everyone! Don’t forget to upload your work onto SMH and share it with your teacher.

Language Paper 2: Bar Reviews

In this lesson you will:

  • Develop your skills as a reader of non fiction
  • Read two sources from different time periods
  • Think carefully about the similarities and differences between the experiences of the writers
  • Write about how the writers describe / convey their perspectives / viewpoints

You will need:

  • A downloaded copy of the sources (don’t worry if you can’t print!)
  • Something to make notes with – either pen/paper or on a computer / device.

TASK ONE:

Read both sources. Make sure you read the information in bold before you start reading. When you read, make some short notes to summarise the main details described. Use the 5 Ws as a prompt. Use the glossaries at the bottom of each page to help you with some of the more difficult words.

  • WHAT happens in each source?
  • WHO is involved? Who is mentioned? Who is the writer?
  • WHEN does each source take place?
  • WHERE is the exhibition? What is the setting like?
  • WHY are the exhibitions created? What is their purpose? What are they designed for?

TASK TWO:

Here is today’s question:

Compare how the writers convey their different experiences and opinions of the bars they visit.

In your answer you should:

  • Compare their different experiences and opinions
  • Compare the methods the writers use to convey their opiniongs
  • Use quotations from each source

To help you prepare for this question, try to make 2-3 bullet points about the experiences and opinions each writer has. You might want to consider:

Who seems most impressed? Which bar is most exciting? Which bar seems more expensive and well designed? #Do both writers have fun, or are their exeriences different? Are they visiting for the same reason, or different reasons? How do they enjoy their visits in different ways?

TASK THREE:

Now we are going to start thinking about the question more specifically:

Compare how the writers convey their different experiences and opinions of the bars they visit.                                                                              

To do this question well, you need to select interesting quotations from each source. You must then attempt to explain how the writer’s language choices help present / display their opinions and experiences. Your next task is to pick 2-3 quotations from each source and make short notes on how the quotations help present their experiences.

Here is an example:

Source A (The Gin Shop) Quotation: “beyond the bar is a lofty and spacious salloon, full of the same enticing vessels”

Ideas: ‘Spacious’ could suggest there is plenty of room – it appears comfortable and welcoming. The word ‘enticing’ shows how appealing the drinks were. The writer is believes teh bar is comfortable, appealing and is enjoying his experience

TASK FOUR:

Before you try and answer the question, fill in the gaps below and try to writer 3-4 potential topic sentences you could use in your longer answer.

Both writers describe their __________ experiences of the bars they visit, but in different ways.

Whilst Dickens finds the ‘Gin shop’ to be ________ and _______ , Pentelow’s review on the ‘Coral Room Bar’ focusses more on the bar’s ____________ .

Both writers speak positively about the bars they visit. Dickens is _______ because _________ whereas Pentelow describes________.

One key difference between the two bars described by the writer is ______ .

TASK FIVE:

Now you are going to write your answer to the question. You should spend around 15-20 minutes writing. Pick two of your topic sentences from task four to help you get started. Here is reminder of the question:

Compare how the writers convey their different experiences and opinions of the bars they visit.   

  • Compare their different experiences and opinions
  • Compare the methods the writers use to convey their opiniongs
  • Use quotations from each source

You can use the writing frame below to help you, as well as the key vocabulary list. You can also donwload a copy of the writing frame.

Key tips for this question:

  • Write a similar amount for each source.
  • Use quotations from each source
  • Unpick the writer’s language choices (like interesting words) in detail
  • Try to explain how the writer’s language choices help us understand their experiences and opinions
  • Offer brief comparisons about the similar / different ways the writer’s feel about their visits

Here is the writing frame. You can also donwload it as a powerpoint slide. You should spend 15 minutes writing.

Well done everyone! Don’t forget to upload your work onto SMH and share it with your teacher.

Language Paper 2: Paranormal Activity

This lesson uses the same skills that you practised in your language lesson last week but with a new text.

In this lesson you will:

  • Develop your skills as a reader of non fiction
  • Read two sources from different time periods
  • Think carefully about the similarities and differences between the sources
  • Write a summary of the differences, showing off your understanding

You will need:

  • A downloaded copy of the sources (don’t worry if you can’t print!)
  • Something to make notes with – either pen/paper or on a computer / device.

TASK ONE:

Read both sources. Make sure you read the information in bold before you start reading. When you read, make some short notes to summarise the main details described. Use the 5 Ws as a prompt. Remember, in language paper two you always have two sources to read with a linked theme.

  • WHAT happens in each source?
  • WHO is involved? Who is mentioned? Who is the writer?
  • WHEN does each source take place?
  • WHERE is the experience happening? Where are they? (For source A)
  • WHY does the writer believe/not believe in ghosts?

TASK TWO:

For today’s question, you will need to be able to compare the two sources, exploring similarities and differences. Use the following questions to add to your notes and help you get started. When you think about the two writers’ thought on paranormal activity, consider:

Which idea seems more believable? How does Conan Doyle feel with the first paranormal experience? How does he feel about the second experience? Are they surprised? What mood does the writer of Source B seem to be in? What’s his main argument?

TASK THREE:

Now we are going to start thinking about the question more specifically:

Both sources describe different experiences with and opinions on paranormal activity.                          

Using details from both sources, write a summary of the different views on paranormal activity.

Your job will be to write a summary, but first you need to select 3-4 quotations from each source which you think give us the most information about the writer’s views on paranormal activity.
Copy out your quotations and make notes on what each quotation reveals about the exhibition.

Expect to find this slightly harder for Source B. The writer is not as obviously saying what they think, but they are still showing you their opinions on paranormal activity through what they choose to talk about.

Here’s an example:

Source B (Do Ghosts Exist?)
Quotation: “There’s nothing wrong with personal experiences, but they are not evidence of anything other than that people scare themselves in dark, spooky places”

Ideas: Shows the writer feels that people let their own fear get in the way of knowing what is true and what isn’t. People base their opinions on feelings instead of fact.

TASK FOUR:

Now you are going to write your answer to the question. You should spend around 15-20 minutes writing. Here is a reminder of it:

Both sources describe different experiences with and opinions on paranormal activity.                          

Using details from both sources, write a summary of the different views on paranormal activity.

You can use the writing frame below to help you, as well as the key vocabulary list. You can also download a copy of the writing frame.

Key tips for this question:

  • Write a similar amount for each source.
  • Use short quotations (even single word quotations are fine)
  • Try to say a lot about a little.
  • Stay focussed on the question – make sure you are comparing the writers’ views on paranormal activity
  • You are asked about the differences, but that doesn’t mean you can’t write about ways they might be similar

Here is the writing frame. You can also download it as a powerpoint slide. You should spend 15 minutes writing.

Well done everyone! Don’t forget to upload your work onto SMH and share it with your teacher.

Language Paper 2: London Exhibitions

In this lesson you will:

  • Develop your skills as a reader of non fiction
  • Read two sources from different time periods
  • Think carefully about the similarities and differences between the sources
  • Write a summary of the differences, showing off your understanding

You will need:

  • A downloaded copy of the sources (don’t worry if you can’t print!)
  • Something to make notes with – either pen/paper or on a computer / device.

TASK ONE:

Read both sources. Make sure you read the information in bold before you start reading. When you read, make some short notes to summarise the main details described. Use the 5 Ws as a prompt. Remember, in language paper two you always have two sources to read with a linked theme. One of the sources is always from the 19th Century (the 1800s).

  • WHAT happens in each source?
  • WHO is involved? Who is mentioned? Who is the writer?
  • WHEN does each source take place?
  • WHERE is the exhibition? What is the setting like?
  • WHY are the exhibitions created? What is their purpose? What are they designed for?

TASK TWO:

For today’s question, you will need to be able to compare the two sources, exploring similarities and differences. Use the following questions to add to your notes and help you get started When you think about the two places to visit (exhibitions)….

Which seems more impressive? Which is in a prettier area or space? Which has a clearer purpose? Which seems most enjoyable? Which is more popular? Which is more contraversial? Which is more modern? What does each exhibition do? Why was each one built? Which is more successful?

TASK THREE:

Now we are going to start thinking about the question more specifically:

Both sources describe different tourist attractions (exhibitions) in London.                                                                                    

Using details from both sources, write a summary of the different exhibitions.

Your job will be to write a summary, but first you need to select 3-4 quotations from each source which you think give us the most information about the different exhibitions. Copy out your quotations and make notes on what each quotation reveals about the exhibition.

Here is an example:

Source A (The London Exhibition) Quotation: “vast, strange, new, and impossible to describe” Ideas: Shows the exhibition is exciting and thrilling in its size. Shows that the writer finds it spellbinding and awe inspiring. Shows that she is amazed beyond words.

TASK FOUR:

Now you are going to write your answer to the question. You should spend around 15-20 minutes writing. Here is a reminder of it:

Both sources describe different tourist attractions (exhibitions) in London.    

Using details from both sources, write a summary of the different exhibitions.

You can use the writing frame below to help you, as well as the key vocabulary list. You can also donwload a copy of the writing frame.

Key tips for this question:

  • Write a similar amount for each source.
  • Use short quotations (even single word quotations are fine)
  • Try to say a lot about a little.
  • Stay focussed on the question – make sure you are comparing the exhibitions (places to visit)
  • You are assked about the differences, but that doesn’t mean you can’t write about ways they might be similar

Here is the writing frame. You can also donwload it as a powerpoint slide. You should spend 15 minutes writing.

Well done everyone! Don’t forget to upload your work onto SMH and share it with your teacher.

Extension:

Did you know that both these exhibitions are real? You can read more about them here:

Language Paper 2 Question Three

Here’s a quick blog post explaining how to approach question three on language paper 2. You might want to download the following resources before you watch the video. The first resourse is the lessons slides. The second resource is the source you’ll need for the lesson.

Although the video below uses the source on ‘cycling’, you could absolutelyuse the advice any time you answer language paper 2 question 3.

Language Paper 2: Past Papers

Click on the links below to download and print seven different past papers.

Remember, you can get more hints, tips and advice from your English teacher or on Fridays after school.